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grab by egypt's president. mohammed morsi is insisting he acted within the rights when he granted himself sweeping powers last week. correspondent steve harrigan has the latest from cairo. >> egypt president mohammed morsi is looking for a way out the fire storm he created thursday when he claimed the orders were not subject to review by egypt's court that move sparked four days of violent street in egypt. in the protest, 13 offices of the muslim brotherhood, morsi's chief supporters were ransacked or set on fire. morsi met today with senior judges from the judiciary council looking for a compromise to halt the violence. aides say morsi might be willing to limit the scope of his decree, but not withdraw it entirely. morsi supporters say the increased powers are only temporary, until a new constitution is completed. opponents say it's a power grab and part of an attempt to instill islamic law in egypt. >> we demand the president listen to people who chose it. people elected him so he would defend the people. not to do what he pleases. >> the administration was careful with the word
it in the fascinating relationship between president obama and mohammed morsi. two mag ma tist pragmatists trya way to mediate this. you see it in the backdrop of surprising riots in jordan which will cause increasing problems, you have that changing environment which you know far more about. but the arab street needs something different. these governments now need to be more responsive to their people so that is an opening for a different relationship. and the president, no american president is going to criticize israel's launching of this war. but this is an opening for a relationship with egypt, with turkey, to implement a cease-fire that will monitor arms smuggling into gaza. that will monitor israel's relationship. overarching all of it, such a painful issue to discuss. overarching -- all of it is a history. going back at least to '67. of the united states' role, maybe, the united states' role as the enabler. as the political diplomatic economic military enabler of an israeli policy. in many ways, a younger generation is seeing israelis, that is not in the long-term benefit of the security of
and morsi. two pragmatists trying to find a way to mediate this immediate conflict. you see it against the backdrop of an islamist backdrop of turkey and the riots in jordan that will cause increasing problems. you have that changing environment which you know more about. the arabs need something different. the governments need to be more responsive to their people. it's an opening for a different relationship. no american president is going to criticize, i would argue, israel's launching of this war. it is an opening for our relationship with egypt, turkey, to implement a cease-fire to monitor gaza and israel's relationship, but overarching all of it, it's a painful issue to discuss. anything we say on this show is going to be criticized. >> you think? >> i think. it's a history. going back to at least '67, the united states role as the enabler, as the political diplomatic economic enabler that in many ways, in a younger generation is seeing israelis that is not in the long term benefit of the security of the country. i make one last point. i urge your viewers to try to watch an israe
president. i'm rick folbalm. >> heather: and i'm heather childers. accusing morsi of an unprecedented attack on the judiciary. and this is after last year's revolution and they continued to stage rallies across the country, sparking new fears on the instability in an already volatile part of the world. steve harrigan is streaming live for us from cairo, egypt. steve? >> heather, there's a showdown between egypt' new president, morsi and the chief judges throughout the country say they will not go back to work as long as the president's orders stand, basically putting anything he says, any decree he makes, above the law and not subject to the court and we could have a country where prosecution basically shuts down. as far as the protesters in cairo, they've set up tents on tahrir down from yesterday, 40,000, yesterday afternoon and it turned violent and other cities, xaalexandria and police cars set on fire and other fires set as well. the next move in the battle will shape up to be tuesday when supporters of the president plan a march and also protesters, people who feel this president is tr
egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all the demonstrators angry after president morsi declared some controversial decrees that temporaril
in the growing outrage over the president morsi's takeover. last week, the president from the muslim brotherhood issued several decrees including an order that every decision he makes is a final decision, no review. critics say he appointed himself as a dictator two years after a massive popular uprising ousted mubarak. our eyes and ears on the ground, these are the latest crowds you have seen in tahrir square, right, steve? >> the five days since the decree we wondered if the protests would get bigger or smaller. they are growing larger and more angry. the crowd today well over 100,000 people in tahrir square, and from different walks of life, different political stories. the opposition to the president has been unified by his decree expanding his own power. so we have people on want the old days of mubarak. you have liberals. nationalists. they are all angry at an overstepping by this president and they all coming out to the square. this is the way they are trying to use their leverage against the president. the chant are the same "this regime must leave." >>shepard: disturbing to hear your re
the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judiciary by banning anyone -- any authority, even the judiciary, from questioning, appealing any decisions he made since june. the question was going into this meeting, would he scale back on some of those d
to the government in egypt, the president mohamed morsi, that they would stop firing into israel. if that were to be revoked, that would be a violation. they would be breaking their word to the egyptians and that would cause some serious repercussions i assume, christiane, between the egypt government, muslim brotherhood-led government, and hamas. >> reporter: well, i was obviously talking about what's the perspective from this side was. but of course israel's demand was that there would be no more rockets and no more of that fire going into israel. that was something they really wanted. and of course israel does not want to see hamas resupplied through the tunnel network. that is still to be worked out. i asked him whether or not he got weapons and whether hamas was getting weapons from iran, and he gave me a non-confirmation confirmation. it's an open secret that they come through those tunnels. so that has to be taken in hand. we're not sure how that's going to happen, but obviously there is some egyptian role in that as well. but, yes, egypt is the guarantor of this cease-fire. neither sid
now. demonstrators are back spending the night in tahrir square. president mohamed morsi announced sweeping new powers for himself. ordering egyptian court not to overturn any decree or law issued since he took office. as the crowds gather there's a growing unease over what could happen next. >> reporter: demonstrations continue against egyptian president mohamed morrissey not the big numbers that we saw on friday but certainly still a lot of people out here, lots of food stands, about 30 tents, which is an indication that many of these protesters want to be here for a while. it's not clear how long they will day here. when you talk to them they seem determined to speak out against mr. morsi's controversial decrees. >> the beginning avenue era for a tyrant. >> he's saying that nobody can revise what i say. he's actually throwing the new system out of the scene. >> reporter: big developments in meeting rooms and news conferences on saturday where factions posed to mr. morsi made moves to put pressure on the president. of course a number of his decrees seem to weaken the judiciary. t
asking you about what's going on in egypt right now where muhammad morsi must feel pretty emboldened after playing such a crucial role in helping to broker a ceasefire between's reel and hamas. -- between israel and hamas. he is now sort of changing the law of the land, a power grab. how's this going to work out? is. >> well, i think he's revealed his true stripes. this is not democracy in action, this is a classic effort at one person, one vote, one time. he's, obviously, met resistance. let's hope it's successful. but i think it's just highly ironic that after dozens of commentators left and right in this country hailed muhammad morsi for his responsible conduct with respect to gaza and how he wasn't acting like an an extremist from the muslim brotherhood got what he, got what he needed from the ceasefire agreement and immediately began acting like an extremist from the muslim brotherhood. that should be what we focus on going forward. and for anybody who thinks the ceasefire in gaza is durable, all they had to do was read these headlines about what morsi did in egypt the day after
of strength from the opposition that spent days blasting egypt he is new president, morsi. he upset just about everybody last week when he decided to give himself broad new powers that say his decisions don't need approval from any court. essentially he's above the law. really no different than a dictator. protests showed their across the country, some of them violent. street fighting this between demonstrators and police. president morsi tried to calm the criticism by promising to reserve his new powers for only the most important decisions. but that didn't appease the protesters. remember, just last week, the united states was publicly praising president morsi when he helped end the conflict between israel and gaza. the white house says president obama has not spoken to his egyptian counterpart since then and today the press secretary jay carney said basically the egyptians need to work this out themselves. there is no evidence that will happen any time soon. right now this enormously influential nation where people forced out of dictator last year again threatens to fall into chaos and inst
in this, president morsi's role was really a wonderful sight for the future, it tells us that the muslim brotherhood who control egypt are going to be a major force throughout the region are going to be moderates and are going to try to -- >> with a price. >> that's real concern. to follow-up on something that joe said, everyone is happy that there was a cease-fire. but i think, actually, the wrong lessons are going to be learned by both sides. what's going to eand up in this process, israelis now want a military conflict and the palestinians who want to confront israel, they'll be emboldened for different reasons. the big problem is, fear exists on both sides. i wrote about this this week as well as the fiscal cliff. i don't think either side can see a future where conflict doesn't exist. the conflict has now given their lives meaning. if they take away the conflict, israel doesn't have a meaning. and the palestinians don't have a meaning. >> i feel some people actually started to see what was going on in the past week, in the middle east and started to actually turn away, thinking, not
gotten the basic answers. >>> protesters demand an end to mohamed morsi's seizure of absolute power. >>> american civil liberties union is suing the pentagon to remove all restrictions on women in battle, calling the current strate strategy discriminatory. >> you're one of 12 kids, is that right? >> i'm one of 11 kids. >> well, you're probably catholic, right? we're just hillbillys. >>> reportedly lost his job over the map app. >>> premiere of "the hobbit" is getting under way. new z new zealand has unveiled a hobbit-themed airplane. of course, real hobbit fans only fly virgin. >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." we're in washington where lawmakers have just 34 days left to reach a deal before the a potentiaff deadline. that ning funded by cbs confidence is slowly starting to fade away and major is with us >>> major garret is with us in the studio. what's happening? >> americans might say, look, it feels like time is running out. they would be correct. nal republicwhite house and ote mostional republicans say they'll devote most if not all of this week, and things are slowing down an
're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon:. i'm jon scott. the first elected leader, president mohammed morsi expected to come face-to-face with senior judges in egypt who say his power grab has gone too far. there are indications that the both side are trying to find some middle ground. morsi's maneuver unleased a rage of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's side that compromise may be in the offing. perhaps a scaling down of that presidential decree which basicall
at an international level. morsi on one day is a hero. he's brokered a deal. the second day he's under assault by the very people in the street who swept him into power. how do you assess what's going on and our capacity to nudge him toward maintaining a democratic framework? >> the nudging is being done by members of the international monetary fund and individuals saying to egypt if you want money for your country to thrive, you have to backtrack a little. one of the interesting dynamics going on here is that as difficult as morsi's actions the other day were to swallow for those of us who live in a democracy, the judiciary there is really not blameless either. they dissolved one of the houses of parliament there. there is a threat they may do it to the other legislative body. i do think that morsi might be -- his power grab might be unseemly and undemocratic but there is something nefarious going on by the other branch. >> eliot: his power grab was terribly calibrated. there is a school of thought he had a lot of interna
was immiment to the political crisis over president morsi's decision to grant himself sweeping pours, a move that's touched days of street violence. president morsi says the move is temporary and he plans to meet with the country's supreme judicial council. supporters and opponents of the president are planning big protests tomorrow. >>> 7:15. united states supreme court gets involved in the historic gay marriage debate this week. ktvu's alison burns in our washington, d.c. newsroom with the cases now facing the court. alison? >> reporter: dave, the justices will meet behind closed doors to decide whether to take up any of the cases related to same-sex marriage this week. now, tops among those cases, of course, california's proposition 8, the 2008 voter- approved ban on same-sex marriage. if the court decides not to take up a challenge to proposition 8, that means gay and lesbian couples would legally be able to legally marry in california right away. the justices are also considering whether to take up challenges to the federal law that defines marriages between a man and a woman. legal ana
in cairo against president mohammed morsi and his decree granting himself nearly absolute power. more than 200,000 people packed tahrir square. >>> four female soldiers who served tours in iraq or afghanistan filed a federal lawsuit yesterday trying to force the pentagon to end a ban on women serving in combat jobs. the suit says service women have often found themselves in combat without receiving the same rewards or opportunities for promotion. >>> a federal judge is ordering big tobacco companies to run ads saying they deliberately deceived the american public about the health effects of smoking. appeals are expected. >>> and prince william and his wife kate who became the duke and duchess of cambridge on their wedding day last year made their first official visit to cambridge this morning. the couple are meeting with students from cambridge university. they will also visit a homeless charity and hospital. >>> here's how wall street will kick off the day. the dow fell 89 points yesterday. the s&p was down seven. the nasdaq lost nine. overseas markets were also down. in tokyo, the nikkei
questions that need answers. abc news, washington. >> a simmering protest against mohammed morsi's power grab erupted violence today in tahrir square. one demonstrateor reportedly killed by a canister during a running street battle. 100,000 egyptians are protesting against the debris -- decree granting morsi absolute control of the country. demonstrators are afraid it will lead to a dictatorship. >> officials took samples from yas yas yas's body. his widow requested on whether he was killed by israeli agents using a radio active poison a charge israel denied. yair fat was 75 years old when he died eight years ago. >> the bangladesh called a factory fire that killed 111 garment workers the work of an arsonist, labeling it sabotage but they're not releasing anymore information about a motive. closings dr dr clothing from the western states are made there. protestors marched through the streets. >> a bold move by fda shut down the biggest organic peanut butter plant in the country. we told you with this yesterday at 4:00. today, more about what fda inspectors found inside of that facility.
morsi gave back the powers that he took himself days ago. liberates and moderates feel that he's trying to push the democracy back into dictatorship. president morsi says it will remain this way until the constitution is finalized. i want to bring in reza sayeh. first of all, give us a feeling of what is happening on the streets and how people feel about where they are in this. >> reporter: well, protesters are still here, nowhere near the numbers of the 1 million demonstration last night. but we have a whole bunch of other collision courses taking shape, suzanne, that could complicate this. here's why. president morsi wants the new constitution drafted immediately. 100-member panel has been designed to write this new constitution but there's been a whole lot of problems and conflict. the panel is dominated by supporters of the muslim brotherhood, islamists. many liberal members have quit and protested. >> reza, we have breaking news. senator bob corker, a republican from tennessee reacting to susan rice's statements. >> i very much appreciate the transparency and type of conversations
almost two years ago, the demonstrators are voicing their anger with president mohamed morsi after what some are calling an unprecedented power grab. cnn's reza sayah is joining us from cairo once again. reza, we're hearing about attacks against several muslim brotherhood offices in egypt. what do you know about that? >> reporter: according to the brotherhood spokesperson, two of their offices were attacked by anti-morsi protesters. the brotherhood says the protesters were carrying molotov cocktails, clubs and knives and destroyed and heavily damaged these offices. remember, muslim brotherhood had called for a one-million-man demonstration of their own today to rival the opposition's demonstrations. late last night they called it off to avoid violence. but in these two particular cities north of cairo, they didn't avoid violence. >> reza, we're also seeing and i want to show our viewers some live pictures from tahrir square in cairo not far from where you are right now. you were there earlier in the day. who are these protesters? and there are huge numbers there. we see the tents. what'
, secretary of state clinton will fly to cairo, egypt to meet with prime minister morsi that has been holding peace talkings. >> brian: yesterday we are talking about peace talk and hear a cease fire kicking in and we know it department happen and the bombing didn't stop. and this, this morning lerand viter is in tel aviv where a bomb went off in the city. leland. >> i am setting the scene for you on my israeli answer to the pentagon. a city threw a bomb on to the bus or left one it is not a suicide bomber, but 10 people were injured. three of them very seriously wounded here in this attack. the two suspects on the list would be hamas or islamic jihad, both operating out of the gaza strip. hamas is peace talks and trying to figure out if a cease fire over israel with the rockets and the bombings on the other side going into the gaza strip . islamic jihad has a different agend a. they are backers in iran who are pushing for rocket fire against the gaz strip. we should have a shot up of this on our live view, you can actually see this bus that stopped. this harkens back to the days of the secon
president mohammed morsi stood by his decision to essentially give himself complete control over egypt. he says it's only temporary. you may recall last week he issued several decrees. including an order that all decisions he makes are final. and one that states no legislature and no court can overturny law that he makes. if that sounds like a dictatorship to you, it does to these people, too. they are pro-democracy protesters who have responded to days of clashes that have led to one death and hundreds of injuries. all of this less than two years after a popular uprising ousted hosni mubarak. the white house has not spoken with the ejimtion counter part since his power grab but they are keeping a close eye on the situation. >> we have raised concerns. i think the state department put out a statement on this or new one addressed it in a briefing. i think the state department might have more information for you on, you know, specifically how we have communicated those concerns. but, you know, our interest is in the process, the transition towards democracy. >> shepard: also today secretary
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)